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St. Louis Arch over the St. Louis Old Courthouse

Doobie Rolls Into St. Louis, Missouri

Doobie is entering the St. Louis, Missouri market, and we wanted to provide a little history on the Missouri relationship with the cannabis plant and the latest status of cannabis legalization in the Show Me “Your Weed” State.

Cannabis Legalization History

So is marijuana legal in Missouri? Not quite. While recreational cannabis use is still illegal for residents of Missouri, the state has been making progress recently towards full cannabis legalization. In 2014, through Senate Bill 491, cannabis was decriminalized to some extent, but the bill did not take effect until January 2017. While SB 491 reduced penalties for some cannabis offenses, possession of cannabis was still treated as a misdemeanor crime. 

Also in July 2014, the Missouri Medical Marijuana Bill (House Bill 2238) was signed into law by Governor Jay Nixon. This bill legalized the use of CBD oil to treat seizures. The measure set a 4 percent tax on medical cannabis sales with proceeds earmarked for services for military veterans. This legislation “allows the Department of Agriculture to grow industrial hemp for research purposes and allows the use of hemp extract to treat certain individuals with epilepsy.” HB 2238 only allows hemp extract that contains at least 5% cannabidiol (CBD) and no more than 0.3% tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

In November 2018, Missouri residents made a giant step towards Missouri marijuana legalization and approved Amendment 2 to legalize the medical use of cannabis. Passing with 66% of the vote, the ballot measure allows qualified patients to purchase no less than 4 oz of cannabis per month and to grow up to six cannabis plants.

On October 17, 2020, Missouri had its first licensed sale of medical cannabis.

More recently, as reported by Marijuana Moment and Fox, Republican Representative Shamed Dogan introduced a joint resolution (HJR 30, or the Smarter and Safer Missouri Act) in December 2020, where voters in Missouri could decide in 2022 whether to legalize marijuana. The proposal would replace the existing medical cannabis law and replace it with a simpler system that would cover both patients and adult consumers. Both the House and Senate would need to approve the legislation for the legalization question to go to voters. HJR 30 would legalize marijuana for adults 21+ and establish a commercial cannabis industry, taxing legal sales at 12 percent. Regarding social equity, there is no mention in the proposal.

Drogan is proposing low tax rates to prevent Missouri residents from buying from the illicit market. “If you make that tax too high, then you still have a pretty robust black market,” Dogan said.

St Louis Cannabis Legalization History

Named after King Louis IX of France, St. Louis is referred to as the Gateway to the West. With a population of almost 300K, St. Louis is the 2nd most populous city in Missouri behind Kansas City. 

In St. Louis, there had been some earlier reductions in sentencing for crimes of cannabis. In April 2013, the St. Louis Board of Aldermen voted to allow police to cite individuals instead of arresting them for small amounts of cannabis. Cited persons would be subject to a fine and processed in municipal court versus state court. This law went into effect in June 2013. 

In February 2018, penalties were further reduced when the Board voted to set a $25 fine for possession of up to 35g of cannabis, and in April of 2021, St. Louis City Council voted to reduce the penalties for certain amounts of recreational cannabis possession (35g).  It is reduced from a fine of not more than $1,000 or one year in jail or both to a fine of not more than $100.

How To Get A Medical Card

Getting your medical card in Missouri is a much easier process than in its neighbor, Illinois. Patients suffering from any chronic or debilitating condition for which pharmaceuticals are normally prescribed may be eligible for a medical card. The law allows patients to receive qualification through “the professional judgment of a physician,” which means a patient can get a medical card even if a doctor believes cannabis could help with an ailment that isn’t included on Missouri’s list of qualifying conditions listed below:

  • Migraines
  • Chronic pain
  • PTSD
  • Cancer
  • Terminal illnesses
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS

Also, Missouri doctors do not have to provide a long-term relationship with their patients to certify they have a qualifying condition.

Patients can easily get their medical card online by visiting sites like NuggMD or Heally, where for between $100-$150 for the year, patients can be certified to receive a medical card. After the online visit, the recommendation will be available within an hour for download. Patients must next register for the Missouri Medical Marijuana Program using the online Complia application portal. The Physicians Certification for Medical Cannabis Form will need to be submitted via the application portal on the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services’ online registry along with a $25 fee. The Missouri State Health Department will mail you a Missouri medical card in 30 days or less. 

Once fully approved by the state, patients can purchase up to 4oz of cannabis per month, and patients who register to grow have the option to grow up to 6 plants.

According to Marijuana Policy Project (MPP), as of January 2021, the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services reported that the medical cannabis program had 100,000 patients registered, who are served by 56 approved dispensary facilities.

Doobie is partnering with Jane Dispensary in the St. Louis market, and they will be bringing their medical marijuana delivery service to several local cities and counties (including Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Saint Charles County, Franklin County, Jefferson County, Warren County, and Lincoln County). Getting marijuana from your favorite St. Louis dispensary just got a little bit easier.

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